FAQs

As a leading storage tank supplier, tanks.ie receives enquiries about safe, secure and environmentally responsible fuel storage. To find answers to some of the most Frequently Asked Questions... just click the relevant category to your need. If however, you have a question we haven't answered then please do not hesitate to contact us for further assistance

 

IMPORTANT INFORMATION: Every effort is made to keep this area of the site up to date. However, Tanks.ie cannot be held liable for errors or omissions. Compliance with statutory requirements is the responsibility of the person(s) who install, use and maintain products supplied by Tanks.ie. If you have concerns over compliance, you must seek professional advice, contact your local Building Control Officer, your local environmental authority or OFTEC. Tanks.ie strongly advises that all oil storage installations should be installed and maintained only by an OFTEC Registered Technician. Tanks.ie will not be responsible for installations which do not comply with prevailing statutory requirements.


Oil Tanks
What is a Single Skin Tank?

A single skin oil tank consists of a single container in which fuel is stored. Single skin oil tanks are not suitable for the storage of fuel at commercial, industrial or institutional premises; or at domestic installations with an installed capacity of over 2,500 litres - unless installed within a suitably bunded area. For all other installations, an Oil Tank Risk Assessment must be undertaken by a competent person prior to installation and in accordance with the requirements of OFTEC Technical Instruction Book 3. In anticipation of future possible regulations, serious consideration should be given to fitting a Bunded Tank, even where a single skin tank may currently suffice.
Click here to view our Single Skin Tanks

What is a Bunded Tank?

A Bunded Tank simply consists of an 'oil tank within an oil tank'. In the event of a spillage, surplus liquid will collect in the outer tank, thus averting a pollution incident. Bunded Tanks are now required at commercial, industrial, institutional, commercial and most domestic premises.

How close to a boundary can I place an oil storage tank?

If the oil tank has a nominal capacity of less than 3,500 litres, it should not be placed any closer than 760mm to a boundary. This assumes that there are no flue outlets or buildings between the tank and the boundary. Where these distances cannot be achieved, the protection measures noted in OFTEC Technical Instruction Book 3 and British Standard BS5410 must be provided by means of a 30-minute fire resistant wall which extends a minimum of 300mm above and beyond the ends of the oil tank. For oil tanks with a nominal capacity of 3,500 litres or greater please contact your local Building Control Officer or OFTEC.

How close to a flue outlet can I place an oil tank?

Oil tanks with a nominal capacity of less than 3,500 litres should not be placed within 1.8 metres of a flue outlet. Where these distances cannot be achieved, the protection measures noted in OFTEC Technical Instruction Book 3 and British Standard BS5410 must be provided by means of a 30-minute fire resistant wall which extends a minimum of 300mm above and beyond the ends of the tank. For oil tanks with a nominal capacity of 3,500 litres or greater please contact your local Building Control Officer or OFTEC.

How close to a building can I place an oil tank?

Oil tanks with a nominal capacity not exceeding 3,500 litres should not be fitted any closer than 1.8 metres to a non fire-rated (30-minute minimum fire resistance) wall or eaves. Where these clearances cannot be achieved, the measures noted in British Standard BS5410 and OFTEC Technical Instruction Book 3 must be provided i.e. the provision of a 30 minutes (minimum) fire resistant wall which extends at least 300mm above and beyond the ends of the oil tank. It will be necessary to protect exposed eaves forming part of a roof within 1.8 metres of the top of an oil tank to provide a minimum of 30 minutes fire resistance. Cladding can be applied to the eaves in order to prevent fire from spreading to the roof. For oil tanks with a capacity of 3,500 litres or greater, please contact your local Building Control Officer or OFTEC.

Can I place an oil tank inside a domestic garage or building?

Internal oil storage tanks should never be installed in a habitable area and if installed internally, should always be contained within an enclosed chamber. Detailed requirements exist for internal oil storage installations. For more information contact your local Building Control Officer or OFTEC.

From what materials are plastic oil tanks manufactured?

All oil tanks supplied by Tanks.ie are manufactured from Medium Density Polyethylene (MDPE) - a material that displays excellent chemical and impact resistance properties, making it ideal for external fuel storage. Fittings vary according to tank type and supplier. However, in general, fill points are made from either coated mild or stainless steel, outlets from coated mild steel, and vent points are manufactured from plastic. All materials used in the manufacture of oil tanks supplied by Tanks.ie are resistant to the potentially damaging long-term effects of fuel.

What are the base requirements for plastic oil tanks?

All oil tanks must be installed on a flat, level and fire resistant base capable of supporting the weight of the tank when fully laden. If concrete slabs are used they should be a minimum of 50mm thick. The base should extend at least 300mm beyond the widest points of the tank and fully support the base of the tank in its entirety. Piers or pillars are not suitable for this purpose and can cause irreparable damage to the tank.

Can I fit a sight-gauge to a single skin oil tank?

Technically, sight-gauges can still be fitted to a single skin oil tank - subject to prevailing statutory requirements. However, it should be noted that a sight-gauge is a potential leak point and as an environmentally responsible supplier we do not supply them and do not recommend them. Preference should instead be demonstrated to fitting an electronic oil tank contents gauge, which, unlike a sight gauge, is positioned above the maximum level of fuel in the tank, thereby dramatically reducing the likelihood of an environmental pollution incident. An Apollo type electronic oil tank gauging system is fitted as standard to all Harlequin Advance Single-Skin Oil tanks supplied by Tanks.ie - eliminating the requirement to fit a sight-gauge.

Can I fit a sight-gauge to a Bunded Tank?

No. Please note however that all Harlequin Bunded Tanks (except 350BND/ENV), Harlequin Polyrock Bunded Oil Tanks, Harlequin BioBund Bunded tanks, and Harlequin Fuel Stations are pre-supplied with an electronic oil tank contents gauge, which removes the requirement for a sight-gauge to be fitted.

There is a two-pin type socket fitted to my Harlequin oil tank. What is this for?

This permits an LRC enabled delivery driver to plug in his overfill prevention equipment and is not for consumer use.

Are plastic oil tanks designed to protect from the damaging effects of sunlight?

Yes. Every tank sold by Tanks.ie is manufactured from a material which incorporated UV inhibitors. These prevent UV rays from permeating the structure of the tank, thus preventing fuel degradation.

Are plastic oil tanks fitted with sludge-valves / ball-cocks?

No. Openings (other than the tank outlet) are not permitted below the maximum level of fuel in the tank. This reduces the risk of accidental spillage. In the event that contaminants (e.g. water) need to be removed from the tank, they should be removed by an appropriately licensed contractor via the inspection aperture fitted to each tank.

I have discovered the presence of water in my oil. How do I get this removed?

Please contact your local fuel distributor who will be able to provide advice on how best to remove it.

On warm days there is a slight smell of oil from my oil tank. Why?

This is perfectly normal and is simply the fuel venting through the weatherproof vent fitted to the oil tank.

Are plastic Oil Recycling Banks / Waste Oil Tanks suitable for the disposal of petrol or any other highly flammable liquid? 

No. For advice on how to dispose of petrol and any other similarly dangerous liquids, please contact your local authority.

Do you sell gravity feed kits for the delivery of diesel fuel?

No, as an environmentally responsible supplier we do not supply these kits, due to the high risk of accidental damage / discharge associated with their use. Additionally, at many installations today their continued use is illegal. If you require a tank to store diesel fuel for vehicular use, we would advise you consider a Harlequin Fuel Station, or Fuel Point For BioDiesel applications, Harlequin BioFuel Stations are recommended for BioDiesel blends of up to B100. Alternatively, for connection to remote pedestal type dispensing units, Harlequin's BioBund range is ideal. Please note that all BioDiesel tanks supplied by Tanks.ie are suitable only for use with BioDiesel produced in accordance with European Standards.

Do you supply dip-sticks?

No - not as separate items. However, dipsticks are supplied as standard on all Harlequin tanks with a capacity between 650 litres and 2700 litres as standard.

Bladder Tanks
What ground preparation is needed for bladder tanks?

A flat well-drained location is the ideal choice of a site that should be free from rocks, stones, tree stumps or any other sharp objects that may chafe or puncture the tank. On rough or stony ground sharp objects should be removed and ideally a layer of sand laid to provide a base. Maximum care must be taken to avoid placing tanks on ground having a cross slope as the tank is liable to “roll away” when being filled.

Do I need a ground sheet?

Not always, if the ground is free from debris and sharps then you can use these tanks without a ground sheet however, we do recommend using a ground sheet to prolong the life of the bladder tank

How do I fill the bladder tank?

This can be done from the water mains or through a pump with the relevant connector fitted to attach to the bladder tank. This must start slowly (up to max 490 litres per minute) then increased to a maximum of 1,000 litres per minute dependent on tank capacity

How do I empty the bladder tank?

This can be done by gravity or pumped, the tank may have to be lifted slightly to empty any remaining liquid

How do I maintain the bladder tank?

Our bladder tanks are quite easy to maintain. The surface should kept clean of debris and washed down occasionally. The inside can be cleaned through a small hatch using a hose pipe then drained away

Can the bladder tanks be prepaired?

Small cuts and abrasions can be repaired using our repair kit. Larger cuts/splits may have to be repaired at our factory (for a fee)

Oil Tank Gauges
What liquids are the Apollo remote electronic gauges used to monitor?

Kerosene (C1/C2), Agricultural Fuel Oil (A2), Diesel (D) and Water.

Fuel Dispensing Tanks
What are the power requirements for mains powered Harlequin Fuel Stations, Harlequin Fuel Points and Harlequin BioFuel Stations?

13 amp single-phase mains power supply with a Residual Current Device (RCD) fitted at the connection point to the power supply. All mains electrical installations must only be undertaken by a qualified electrician and must be inspected and tested regularly in accordance with statutory requirements.

What liquids are Harlequin Fuel Stations and Harlequin Fuel Points suitable for storing and dispensing?

Diesel (D) to British Standard BS2869. Additionally, Harlequin Fuel Stations and Harlequin Fuel Points are also suitable for the storage and dispensing of Bio-Diesel with a bio-element of up to 5% concentration.

Can I store and dispense Kerosene (C1/C2) from a Harlequin Fuel Station, Harlequin Fuel Point or Harlequin BioFuel Station?

No. The pumps and ancillary equipment fitted to these products are suitable only for use with Diesel. Dispensing a non-approved fuel from this equipment could result in serious injury or death.

Oil Tank Accessories
What are the advantages of a Tiger Loop?

The Tiger Loop is a de-aeration device which removes air from the fuel prior to combustion. The result is a cleaner, more-efficient burn, with reduced emissions and enhanced cold weather performance. Additionally, the Tiger Loop can permit the tank to be positioned lower than the burner and up to 30 metres away. Therefore when connected to a pressure jet burner, it is ideal for Top Outlet Bunded Tank installations and eliminates the need for an undesirable return line. Please note that Tiger Loops are unsuitable for use with installations incorporating a vaporising burner.

How do I prime a Tiger Loop?

The Tiger Loop is self priming.

Do You Supply Dipsticks?

No – not as separate items. However, dipsticks are supplied as standard on all Harlequin tanks with a capacity between 650 litres and 2700 litres as standard.

Do You Sell Gravity Feed Kits for the Delivery of Diesel Fuel?

No, as an environmentally responsible supplier we do not supply these kits, due to the high risk of accidental damage / discharge associated with their use. Additionally, at many installations today their continued use is illegal. If you require a tank to store diesel fuel for vehicular use, we would advise you consider a Harlequin Fuel Station, or Fuel Point.

Water
What liquids are the Apollo remote electronic gauges used to monitor?

Kerosene (C1/C2), Agricultural Fuel Oil (A2), Diesel (D) and Water. To see our range of Apollo Alarms click here.

What can I use rainwater for?

Rainwater can be used for all outdoor uses; watering the garden, washing cars, cleaning down patios, driveways, walls etc, and ornamental ponds. It can also be used inside the house to flush toilets and feed washing machines. Rainwater use means less build-up of calcium deposits in appliances.

Rainwater is not suitable for drinking or for use in showers and baths. Rainwater is generally free of harmful minerals and in most cases chemicals but can be adversely effected by air pollutants and/0r contamination by animals in the catchment area. The only way rainwater can be used for drinking water is if it is treated by ultra-violet filters which are not practical in domestic use as generally a rainwater tank will not store enough water for total consumption in a domestic situation.

What size rainwater harvesting tanks do I need?

The size of a rainwater holding tank must match the demand for water with it’s availability as closely as possible.

BS 8515:2009 provides an authoritative and industry-approved means of calculating the optimum size of tank for household water use.

Unlike other industries it is better to reduce the size of the tank rather than over size it if in doubt as to the requirement. This is due to the benefit of allowing the tank to overflow at least twice a year to flush out floating debris. The tank chosen must therefore be a balance between rainwater supply and water demand.

In order to correctly size the tank, the capacity should be the lesser of either the rainwater supply or the water demand. A worked example demonstrating this principle is shown below:-

tank_size

What’s a potable water tank?

Water tanks can be classified as ‘potable’ and ‘non potable’. If you are storing clean water for human consumption, whether it be for drinking, prepping food or cleaning dishes etc, then a potable water tank is what you are after. All potable tanks must conform to the WRAS (Water Regulations Advisory Scheme) so that the liquid is safe for human consumption.

Non-potable tanks are for the safe storage of non-drinking water or for ‘not suitable’ for human consumption, in many different environments and applications. Non-potable tanks can be used in applications like rainwater harvesting, irrigation, agriculture & horticulture and commercial purposes where mains water is not available.

The difference in classification between the two comes from the materials used during the manufacturing process, specifically the type of plastic used to line the inside of the tank which comes into contact with the contained water. Non potable tanks are more porous, making it easier for the bacteria to grow and can sometimes let off gases which can contaminate the water. The WRAS approved material lines the inside of the tank, making the tank fit for human consumption, either ingested or used on the skin.

What materials are the plastic tanks manufactured from?

Plastic water tanks can be made of lots of different materials, however the majority of tanks we offer are made from either a medium density polyethylene (MDPE) or a high density polyethylene.

What outlet do I require?

The majority of our water tanks come with an outlet as standard. We can offer a range of water tanks where the tanks can either ‘Drilled’ or ‘Undrilled’. ‘Drilled’ meaning allowing water to escape from the tank via the outlet, whereas ‘Undrilled’ is when the outlet will remain sealed, preventing liquid from coming out and ensuring the contents of the tank is only touching plastic.

If the position of the outlet is required in an alternative position to the standard one offered or extra to the one positioned, we can offer a plastic Fusion socket. This can be welded anywhere on the tank using a drawing supplied by us, positions marked out by you, then fitted by the manufacturer.   

Plain tanks (with no outlets) can also be offered.

If you require a plastic fusion socket or a plain tank, then please contact our Customer Service Team, who will be happy to help with your requirements.

Tap or hose tail kits, what’s the difference and when would I need one?

We offer a range of tap kits, each displaying the size of the hosetail and the outlet size the kit will suit. Tap Kit 5 (TPK5) is the best solution if you require a garden hose to be fitted. Our range of Hosetail kits allows you to attach a hose or pipe to the tank, leak-free. They are designed for continuous flow and come in varying sizes depending on the outlet.

All our tap kits come with a Jubilee clip and PDFE tape for that secure fit.

What’s a standard hose pipe size?

UK hose pipe diameters range from ½” to ¾” inch diameters. The majority of standard size garden hoses are 3/4” BSP, however we do offer accessories for the ½” hose, if required.

Baffled Water tanks, what are they and when are they recommended?

Baffled water tanks are tanks with an intergral wall system, which is primarily designed to strengthen and support the structure of the tank, when the tank is full of water.

Due to the structure of the baffles they can also be used for transporting water. The Baffles distrupt the movement of water, from surging from one side to the other. However, if you are transporting water, water tanks can be extremely hazardous when transporting large volumes of water. Please make sure the water tanks are installed and secured correctly, by a suitable qualified person before transportation. Baffled water tanks are an ideal solutions for car valeters, window cleaners or anyone who has to transport liquids using plastic water storage tanks and containers.

Hot Water Cylinders
How Does a Hot Water Cylinder work?

Most hot water cylinders are heated by an external heat source such as a gas boiler or heat pump. The hot water is heated by the heat source and then travels through a copper coil in the hot water tank. The heat is then transferred from the from the external heat source to the water inside the hot water tank which is then connected to a tap or shower outlet.

How do I know if my heating system is a vented or unvented system?

The main differences between a vented and an unvented system is the way the water supply works. With vented or “open” systems, the water supply comes from a cold water tank in the loft. This then uses gravity to carry the water via a “vent pipe” to the hot water cylinder. The cylinder can be copper or stainless steel, and usually lives in an airing cupboard. Because heated water expands, there needs to be somewhere for the expanded hot water to go. In the case of vented systems, the excess water will push back up the vent pipe and back into the tank in the loft.

With unvented systems, the water supply comes directly from the mains water. In the case of unvented systems, when the heated water expands, the expanded water goes into either a separate external expansion vessel (usually installed above the hot water cylinder), or the hot water cylinder itself has an internal expansion vessel. You’ll hear this referred to as a “bubble top” cylinder. As with vented cylinders, the cylinder can be copper or stainless steel, and usually lives in an airing cupboard.

What hot water cylinder do I need for my heating source?

When the only option for the property is to heat the cylinder electrically through an immersion heater, you need to select a “direct” cylinder. When you have a conventional boiler as a heat source, you need to select an “indirect” cylinder. When the property has rentable heat sources available, you need to select either a “solar indirect” or “heat pump” cylinder. Solar indirect cylinders feature two heat exchanger coils, one for connecting to the solar heat source and the other for connecting to a conventional boiler for when insufficient solar energy is available.
When dealing with any unregulated heat source or there are multiple heat sources available, a “thermal store” will usually provide the best solution.

What size hot water cylinder do I need?

For those not familiar with hot water storage, it is important to remember it is usually held at about 60°C, but is intended to be mixed with cold water down to a usable temperature. A bath using 100 litres of hot water at 40°C actually only equates to 60 litres at 60°C. A shower can use 18 litres of hot water per minute at 40°C, which is only 11 litres at 60°C.
The following average consumption levels of hot water (40°C) per person per day can be used as a guide:

  • Low consumption = 20–30 litres
  • Average consumption = 30–50 litres
  • High consumption = 50–70 litres

What if I can’t fit a standard hot water cylinder in my airing cupboard?

With a smaller footprint to height ratio, slimline cylinders can often allow you to get through those narrow loft hatches or fit the cylinder in a tight airing cupboard. However, you will be compromising on the cylinders’ energy efficiency slightly, as tall cylinders such as these lose more heat than shorter fatter cylinders.
Another space-saving solution, a horizontal cylinder allows you to maintain cylinder capacity in situations where height restrictions apply. However, you should be aware horizontal cylinders are marginally less energy efficient with slightly higher heat loss.

IBC's
How do I safely fill an IBC?

To safely fill an IBC first make sure that the pallet, cage and bottle and valve are suitable for use with the intended product. Ensure that the valve is securely tighten to the inner bottle and that the valve is closed and that the drip cap is secured and tightened. Check that the inside of the bottle is clean. When hot  filling product  do not  exceed 65°C. When bottom  filling make sure that  the vents are functioning correctly or open the top cap.  Do not over fill the IBC.  After filling, if the product has a UN number, ensure that the lid seal is correctly  positioned and tighten the screw cap to 70-80 Newton/Meters.

How do I transport an IBC safely?

Do not lift IBCs from the top frame. Ensure that the fork truck tines are fully inserted under the IBC before lifting. Ensure that the vehicle floor is in good condition and free of all nails etc. that could puncture the IBC. Always transport IBCs with the correct labelling attached to the ID Plate.

Always secure IBCs to prevent possible movement during transit.

 

Can the IBC's (intermediate bulk containers) be stacked?

Yes, depending on the pallet type, our IBCs can be stacked as follows whether empty or full:

MX IBCs - with metal or plastic pallets - Up to 4 High (with a maximum SG of 1.6)

SX IBCs - with metal pallets - Up to 4 High (with a maximum SG of 1.6)

LX IBCs - with wooden or plastic pallets - Up to 3 High (with a maximum SG of 1.4)

GRP Tanks
What is a GRP tank?

Glass Reinforced Plastic tanks are made from high quality GRP material manufactured to BS EN 13280:2001, are suitable for all cold water applications, insulated tanks are also suitable for external applications, and are fully WRAS approved.

Benefits of GRP over steel or plastic

Most GRP tanks are supplied fully pre-insulated with PU foam fully encapsulated within the GRP laminate, GRP tanks come in a wide range of standard sizes and can also be supplied bespoke to suit your specific size and configuration requirements.

Whats the difference between an AB or AG air gap tank?

An AG type airgap provides mains water protection from fluid category 1-4 with standard lid arrangement for an inlet float valve fitted in the body of the tank, and an AB type air gap, also known as category 5, is when a raised float valve housing is fitted with a spill over weir in addition to the overflow in the body of the tank.

When is a 1 piece, 2 piece or sectional tank used?

1 & 2 piece tanks are available from 90 to 12,000 litres, sectional tanks can be supplied from 125 to 2,000,000 litres. Usually where access permits a 1 piece can be used without any assembly needed, if access is restricted a 2 piece tank can be installed and the top and bottom halved bolted together on site. Sectional tanks are for where access restrictions or other conditions deny the installation of one and two piece tanks. They comprise of individual bolt-up panels which are assembled on site.

Sizing a float valve for my GRP tank, which one would I need?

A float valve will usually be sized to suit your incoming mains water supply, so if you have a 25 mm incoming mains you will need a 1” float valve. If we supply the float valve with your tank we will size and supply the overflow to suit this.

What is a WRAS tank and is it compulsary?

The Water Regulation Advisory Scheme sets legal requirements for the design, installation, operation and maintenance of plumbing systems, water fittings and water-using appliances. These Regulations and Bye laws apply in all types of premises supplied, or to be supplied with water by a water company. All of our insulated GRP tanks are fully WRAS approved, so can be connected to a mains cold water supply. These regulations do not apply where a property uses a private water supply and does not have a supply of water from a water company.

There are lots of optional extras on the GRP tanks, what are they and are they required?

Our GRP tanks are usually supplied without any connections, as many customers supply and fit their own. However we can supply a comprehensive range of items including inlet float valves, outlet connections and other fittings to suit your individual application. Please contact us to discuss or request a quote for your requirements.

Do you supply pumps with the GRP tanks?

If you require a booster pump, you must fit a break tank to the incoming mains water supply to connect to the pump set. Our GRP tanks are ideal for break tanks. We can supply a wide range of booster sets where a break tank is needed.

Do you offer a clean & disinfection of tanks which have been previously been purchased?

Yes, we can supply a quote for cleaning existing tanks. We can also arrange to clean and disinfect newly installed tanks as part of the supply and assembly service on all new 1, 2 & sectional tanks.

Sewage Treatment Systems
Invert Depth, what is this?

It is the level of the soil pipe entering the septic tank or treatment system.

Gravity or IPS, what is the difference and when would I need them?

If the flow from your system can not release without help, i.e. required to be uplifted you would need a pump to help with this.

Septic Tanks
Septic tanks vs cesspools, which is best?

If you do not have sufficient area required to discharge the run out from a septic tank, you would need a cesspool which requires emptying on a 40 day cycle. Please contact us for help if required.

Due to the new regulations, do I need to upgrade to a Sewage Treatment System?

You would only need to upgrade your septic tank if the run off discharges to a water course.

Standard soak aways are still legal.

My old tank needs some parts replacing do you offer this?

Yes we offer the full range of Klargester replacement parts, please see our wastewater accessories category 

How to Discharge Waste from Septic Tanks

There are 3 options available:

(1) Connect to a main sewer if possible
(2) install a drainage field or
(3) install a sewage treatment plant which treats the wastewater, producing a clear overflow that is environmentally friendly and suitable for discharging.

To see our full range of sewage treatment plants click here

Why should I look after my septic tank system?

If your septic tank system is not in good working order it can be a serious risk to both health and the environment. You also have a legal responsibility to maintain your septic tank system. In looking after your septic tank system, it will have to be emptied less frequently, saving you money. A septic tank system can also be costly to replace if it fails.

What checks should I make on my septic tank system?

If your septic tank system is in good working order you should have the following:

  • Your household drainage should be quick to clear, and toilets should not be backing up
  • There should be no smell from your tank and the cover should be accessible and well fitting
  • The soak away should be dry not swampy, smelly or have prolific grass growth
  • A pale liquid with little or no smell should come from the discharge pipe. It should not be dark, smelly or contain solids
  • Makes sure to keep deep-rooted trees and plants at least 30 m away from your system. Keep the grass nearby short.

If any of the above is showing signs that your septic tank system is not in proper working order, you must get it repaired or replaced by a credited installer.

How often should I empty my septic tank?

Your tank should be emptied once a year so that you do not risk a build up of sludge which can lead to problems with your system. The company you use to empty your septic tank must be registered to do so.

Do I need to register my tank?

Yes you need to register your septic tank with your Local Authority – click here to register https://www.protectourwater.ie/. There is a charge of €50 to register.

Is the landlord responsible for emptying the septic tank?

If you own a property which you rent, or you are a tenant yourself, it can become a little less clear who has the responsibility to empty the septic tank. Maintenance and responsibility can be written into the tenancy agreement. If you are a landlord renting out a property with a septic tank you may need to put measures in place if you want the tenant to take responsibility for the septic tank. You may need an inspection or service after the end of any tenancy period. As a tenant, if it is written into the tenancy agreement that you have responsibility for the septic tank, you might also want to insist upon an inspection to ensure you aren’t inheriting any issues you would then be liable to pay for is one way to do this. Checking the schedule of maintenance and the obligations is another before any serious issues can occur. Following the guidelines of the septic tank is important too.

Do septic tanks need servicing?

You should have your septic tank system regularly maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. If these are not available, ask your local maintenance company for advice. This will save costly repairs or replacement of the sewage system in the long term.

Does my septic tank need a permit?

Owners of properties connected to larger on-site systems where the discharge is in excess of 5 cubic metres per day do not need to register (i.e sports clubs, pubs, hotels, guesthouses and other businesses).  Instead such systems may require a licence from the relevant local authority under Section 4 of the Water Pollution Act 1997. 

How far should my septic tank be from the house?

Septic tanks should be at least 7 metres away from any dwelling. They should also be located within 30 metres of an access point so that the tank can be emptied.

What are some things that should not be put into the septic tank system?
  • Don’t flush anything other than bodily waste and toilet paper down the toilet
  • Don’t dispose of grease or oil down any drain – wipe out pans and pour fat into a container to be disposed of in the bin
  • Don’t put paints, solvents or chemicals down the drain
  • Don’t try to unblock pipes with caustic soda or drain cleaners. Try boiling water instead
  • Don’t connect rainwater pipes to your septic tank

What are your options when it comes to the Septic Tank Regulations

If your current system discharges directly into a water course, you will need to upgrade your system. To go through your options give us a call, and we can talk you through the various options.

Sewage Pumping Stations
What size pump do I require for my Sewage Pumping Station?

The size of the pump required is down to the rise to main from the tank to the sewer, please call us for further help on this.

What size tank do I need?

Tanks are sized on the number of people using the system, you should allow 150 litres per person multiplied by the number of people using the property to calculate your 24hr storage capacity.

For commercial properties please contact us, and we can help size this for you. 

Do the tanks come with any pre-drilled inlet holes?

No the tanks are supplied without an inlet hole, this is usually drilled on site however we do supply the seal to make the hole water tight and should you require us to drill this for you at the factory, we can offer this also.

What type of sewage pump do I need?

Sewage pumps are available in a few different options including effluent pumps, grinder pumps or macerator pumps and submersible pumps. Effluent pumps remove the grey wastewater that stays in your septic tank after the solids have settled and are good for residential and small commercial applications.

Grinder pumps or macerator pumps collect wastewater from your household appliances and fixtures including toilets, washing machines, and bathtubs. Grinder or macerator pumps works by the pump grinding the waste into a fine slurry before pumping it to your septic tank when the water in the tank reaches a certain level from a holding tank to collect waste. Submersible pumps are used for residential, commercial, and agricultural applications.

If you are unsure of the type of sewage pump you need, we are more than willing to help. Please give us a call or send us an email.

What is a sewage pump station and how does it work?

A sewage pump station is a storage chamber incorporating a sewage pump which transfer either the foul or surface water to a local drain, manhole, sewer or soakaway pit.

A pumping station is used where a normal gravity system cannot be, either because there is insufficient fall over a distance, or the common collecting point is lower than the discharge point.

To see our full range of pumping stations click here

A sewage pump is a submerged pump that moves sewage solids from one point to another, usually from a septic tank or sewage treatment plant to a percolation area or soakaway pit which is a distance away of uphill. Alternatively, it can be used to pump into a gravity flow sewer mains.

Which sewage pump is the most efficient?

Effluent pumps are generally more efficient than other sewage pumps as they are only pumping grey water. However, the effluent pumps may not be suitable for your use. The most efficient sewage would be the one that is most suited to your application and system size. If you are unsure of the type of sewage pump you need, we are more than willing to help. Please give us a call or send us an email.

How long should a sewage pump run?

Your sewage pump should not run constantly. Usually it should run from 10 to 15 seconds until the float switch detects the water level has dropped adequately. It will then cut off. If your sewage pump is running constantly it may need to be serviced, repaired or replaced. The average life expectancy of a sewage pump is about 10 years.

Which make of pumps are used in the Sewage Pumping Stations?

In our 2” vortex range we use Hippo 50 pumps for up to 6m head and Hippo 100 pumps for up to 10m head. In our 2” macerator range we use Semison 125GR pumps, in our 2½” vortex range we use Semison 650 pumps and lastly in our 3” vortex range we use hippo 80-200. Details of which can be found either on our website or a copy can be sent across please call for more information.

How do I know if my sewage pump is working correctly?

You may need to service or replace your sewage pump is you find the following: -

  • If the water at the discharge point is dirty or brown
  • The pump is not working at all or sounds like it’s struggling to pump
  • Your pump is constantly running and doesn’t switch off even though no one is using the facilities in the building
  • Sewage is backed up into the building
  • There is a smell of sewage
  • There is no fluid emptying from the holding tank
  • There is no power to the pump

 

If you do require a Service, please give a ring to arrange.

Will my sewage pump need maintenance?

Yes, it is cost effective to get your sewage pump regularly maintained to lengthen the life of the pump. Typically pump servicing will include: -

  • Cleaning out the sump chamber
  • Cleaning of pumps and float switch
  • Electrical test of pumps and all floats
  • Checking all cables for damages and general wear

Pumps

Fuel Pumps
How Does a Fuel Transfer Pump Work?

fuel transfer pump works simple by pumping fuel such as diesel or kerosene from one tank or container to another. Some diesel transfer pumps are rotary vane pumps, others are gear pumps. Electric diesel transfer pumps can be purchased in 12 volt, 24 volt, 230 volt and in ac and dc versions. Some diesel transfer pumps can also be battery operated for remote use.

What is the Best Diesel Transfer Pump?

There are various types of diesel transfer pumps available depending on the application and the volume of fuel you are pumping. For large volumes of fuel, there are disel pumps integrated into fuel management systems so you can track your fuel consumption. 

If you would like our advice on choosing the correct water or diesel pump, then please get in touch with our friendly team today.

For links to our fuel management systems please click Fuel Management Systems

Is it Safe to use a Water Pump to Transfer Diesel?

Because fuel tends to dissolve the gaskets and other materials used in water pumps, water pumps cannot be used to transfer diesel and diesel pumps cannot be used to transfer water. It is recommended that you use the correct pump for your application. There are also specific transfer pumps with liquids of high viscosities

If you are looking for a water pump click Water Pumps to see our range.

Some of our high viscosity pumps are as follows:-

Can I use a Diesel Pump to Transfer Petrol?

No, to transfer petrol you must use an ATEX rated pump which is safe to use in an explosive atmosphere. There are strict guidelines that must be followed in an areas where flamible substances are stored. 

To learn more about the ATEX Directives go to the HSE's website here

One of our Atex Rated Pumps is the Piusi EX50 Atex Pump

Water Pumps
On my Water Pump it mentions about head height. What is this and how do I work out what I require?

Head is the height in which the pump is lifting the waste, measured from cover level of the pump station, to the cover level of the discharge manhole. With this measurement we can ensure we supply a pump powerful enough to lift the waste up that high. We will need to know this and also the distance that it is pumping to make sure the pump quoted is suitable.

Automatic Pump - what does this mean?

An automatic pump is a pump that will automatically turn itself on and off as the liquid level rises and falls. These pumps are usually longer lasting as they do not burn out but switch off automatically if there is no liquid to pump therefore, they do not run dry.

What is a submersible pump?

A submersible pump means that the pump needs to be submerged or covered in liquid specifically the type specified on the pump such as water, wastewater, sewage etc.

Sewage Pumps
Why choose a macerator pump over a vortex pump?

If you have an application where the risk of blockages that could enter the drain run is higher than usual, for example if the property is rented, tenants could unwillingly block the pump, this is also a problem if it is an apartment block as you wouldn’t be able to source who was responsible for blocking It, but everyone would need to pay their share to fix it.

Also, macerator pumps, because of how they cut through the waste, they can pump a much higher head (vertical distance), so when compared to vortex pumps, if you have anything over 10m, you will need to be selecting macerator pumps. Always check the pump flow curves for your application or you can call to speak to one of our technical team if you want to be sure the pumps will do the task at hand.

When to choose a 65mm or 80mm vortex pump over a 50mm vortex pump

If you are concerned about the risk of blockages but also need a flow rate which macerator pumps can’t provide, or even if it’s purely just a faster flow rate you need, a larger 65mm or 80mm pump will be able to achieve this, calculating a specific flow rate to your application is difficult and would be best speaking to a member of our technical team to help specify the right pumps for your station.

Do waste pumps need servicing and if so, how often should this be done?

Waste pumps and your wastewater system in general need regular servicing to keep it in working order. A general desludging of your system and a check of the components such as the sewage pump will keep the sewage treatment system in good working order for longer.

Generally, a good rule of thumb for servicing your sewage pump would be every 1 to 2 years or every time you empty your septic tank. It is a good idea to get it checked regularly to avoid a costly replacement further down the line.

Horizontal vs Vertical pumps

This depends on your existing pump and the type of installation you have or are planning on. The vertical Hippo 50 has a vertical port discharges via a 2” female port and the horizontal Hippo 50 discharges via a horizontal 2” female port but is also DN50 flanged

What is a Vortex Impeller Sewage Pump?

Vortex impeller sewage pumps use centrifugal action. In this sewage pump. the impeller rotates and causes a tornado-like action that pulls the waste into the pump and then sends it into the discharge pipe with little or no contact with the impeller which helps the pump to withstand any stringy material it may encounter. This means there is a much lower chance of clogging the impeller.

What is a Grinder Pump?

A grinder pump takes the wastewater from the holding tank, grinding any waste into a fine slurry and then pumps it into a sewage treatment plant. They can pump over much longer distances but at a slower rate because they are high pressure and low volume pumps.

Do I need a macerator?

Macerator pumps are used only for heads higher than 10m and with a low flow rate when you have a discharge rate restriction imposed by the water authority who own the sewer you discharging into.

Is there an option to have an enclosure for my pump set?

If a booster or compact set is being housed externally, you will need an enclosure to protect the inverter from the elements so anything electronic needs to be protected by an enclosure of some sort, never leave the booster set to face the elements

How much space do I require around my pump?

You require at least 500mm above the break tank so you can service it and inspect it when required. Also, a booster just needs to be installed in a maintainable space so that the inverters can be reviewed if needed via clear walkways and facing into the room, not tucked away down the side of a plant room.