FAQs - Water

As a leading storage tank supplier, tanks.ie receives enquiries about safe, secure and environmentally responsible fuel storage. To find answers to some of the most Frequently Asked Questions... just click the relevant category to your need. If however, you have a question we haven't answered then please do not hesitate to contact us for further assistance

 

IMPORTANT INFORMATION: Every effort is made to keep this area of the site up to date. However, Tanks.ie cannot be held liable for errors or omissions. Compliance with statutory requirements is the responsibility of the person(s) who install, use and maintain products supplied by Tanks.ie. If you have concerns over compliance, you must seek professional advice, contact your local Building Control Officer, your local environmental authority or OFTEC. Tanks.ie strongly advises that all oil storage installations should be installed and maintained only by an OFTEC Registered Technician. Tanks.ie will not be responsible for installations which do not comply with prevailing statutory requirements.


Water

Water Tanks

What’s a potable water tank?

Water tanks can be classified as ‘potable’ and ‘non potable’. If you are storing clean water for human consumption, whether it be for drinking, prepping food or cleaning dishes etc, then a potable water tank is what you are after. All potable tanks must conform to the WRAS (Water Regulations Advisory Scheme) so that the liquid is safe for human consumption.

Non-potable tanks are for the safe storage of non-drinking water or for ‘not suitable’ for human consumption, in many different environments and applications. Non-potable tanks can be used in applications like rainwater harvesting, irrigation, agriculture & horticulture and commercial purposes where mains water is not available.

The difference in classification between the two comes from the materials used during the manufacturing process, specifically the type of plastic used to line the inside of the tank which comes into contact with the contained water. Non potable tanks are more porous, making it easier for the bacteria to grow and can sometimes let off gases which can contaminate the water. The WRAS approved material lines the inside of the tank, making the tank fit for human consumption, either ingested or used on the skin.

What materials are the plastic tanks manufactured from?

Plastic water tanks can be made of lots of different materials, however the majority of tanks we offer are made from either a medium density polyethylene (MDPE) or a high density polyethylene.

What outlet do I require?

The majority of our water tanks come with an outlet as standard. We can offer a range of water tanks where the tanks can either ‘Drilled’ or ‘Undrilled’. ‘Drilled’ meaning allowing water to escape from the tank via the outlet, whereas ‘Undrilled’ is when the outlet will remain sealed, preventing liquid from coming out and ensuring the contents of the tank is only touching plastic.

If the position of the outlet is required in an alternative position to the standard one offered or extra to the one positioned, we can offer a plastic Fusion socket. This can be welded anywhere on the tank using a drawing supplied by us, positions marked out by you, then fitted by the manufacturer.   

Plain tanks (with no outlets) can also be offered.

If you require a plastic fusion socket or a plain tank, then please contact our Customer Service Team, who will be happy to help with your requirements.

Tap or hose tail kits, what’s the difference and when would I need one?

We offer a range of tap kits, each displaying the size of the hosetail and the outlet size the kit will suit. Tap Kit 5 (TPK5) is the best solution if you require a garden hose to be fitted. Our range of Hosetail kits allows you to attach a hose or pipe to the tank, leak-free. They are designed for continuous flow and come in varying sizes depending on the outlet.

All our tap kits come with a Jubilee clip and PDFE tape for that secure fit.

What’s a standard hose pipe size?

UK hose pipe diameters range from ½” to ¾” inch diameters. The majority of standard size garden hoses are 3/4” BSP, however we do offer accessories for the ½” hose, if required.

Baffled Water tanks, what are they and when are they recommended?

Baffled water tanks are tanks with an intergral wall system, which is primarily designed to strengthen and support the structure of the tank, when the tank is full of water.

Due to the structure of the baffles they can also be used for transporting water. The Baffles distrupt the movement of water, from surging from one side to the other. However, if you are transporting water, water tanks can be extremely hazardous when transporting large volumes of water. Please make sure the water tanks are installed and secured correctly, by a suitable qualified person before transportation. Baffled water tanks are an ideal solutions for car valeters, window cleaners or anyone who has to transport liquids using plastic water storage tanks and containers.

Bladder Tanks

What ground preparation is needed for bladder tanks?

A flat well-drained location is the ideal choice of a site that should be free from rocks, stones, tree stumps or any other sharp objects that may chafe or puncture the tank. On rough or stony ground sharp objects should be removed and ideally a layer of sand laid to provide a base. Maximum care must be taken to avoid placing tanks on ground having a cross slope as the tank is liable to “roll away” when being filled.

Do I need a ground sheet?

Not always, if the ground is free from debris and sharps then you can use these tanks without a ground sheet however, we do recommend using a ground sheet to prolong the life of the bladder tank

How do I fill the bladder tank?

This can be done from the water mains or through a pump with the relevant connector fitted to attach to the bladder tank. This must start slowly (up to max 490 litres per minute) then increased to a maximum of 1,000 litres per minute dependent on tank capacity

How do I empty the bladder tank?

This can be done by gravity or pumped, the tank may have to be lifted slightly to empty any remaining liquid

How do I maintain the bladder tank?

Our bladder tanks are quite easy to maintain. The surface should kept clean of debris and washed down occasionally. The inside can be cleaned through a small hatch using a hose pipe then drained away

Can the bladder tanks be prepaired?

Small cuts and abrasions can be repaired using our repair kit. Larger cuts/splits may have to be repaired at our factory (for a fee)

Water Butts

What size water tank do I need for my garden?

The size of your water tank really depends on what you want to use the rainwater for. If it is just for watering the garden, your water butt should be reletive to the size of garden you want to water. As a rule of thumb, you will use 8-10 litres of water for every square meter of garden bed and 5 litres for every establishing fruit tree in the summer period everytime you water. However you do not need to store all this water at one as we have usually have a plentiful supply of rainwater in Ireland. 

Our range of water butts ranges from 200 litres to 750 litres. If you are looking for a larger storage tank you can check out our range of Titan water tanks.

How do I install a water butt?

  1. Select a suitable downpipe to connect your water butt to by using a downpipe filter or diverter. To see our range of filters and diverters go to Rainwater Accessories.
  2. Drill a hole in the water butt around 80 to 100mm from the top on the correct side of the water butt to the downpipe
  3. Secure the hose connector to this hole
  4. Fit the downpipe diverter or rainwater filter to the downpipe at the correct height to allow the diverter to connect into the water butt
  5. Attach a flexible piece of hose from the diverter to the water butt connection.

What do I need to connect my water butt to the drain pipe?

You can use a downpipe filter or diverter to connect a water butt to your drain pipe. To see our range of filters and diverters go to Filters & Siphons.

Rainwater Harvesting

What can I use rainwater for?

Rainwater can be used for all outdoor uses; watering the garden, washing cars, cleaning down patios, driveways, walls etc, and ornamental ponds. It can also be used inside the house to flush toilets and feed washing machines. Rainwater use means less build-up of calcium deposits in appliances.

Rainwater is not suitable for drinking or for use in showers and baths. Rainwater is generally free of harmful minerals and in most cases chemicals but can be adversely effected by air pollutants and/0r contamination by animals in the catchment area. The only way rainwater can be used for drinking water is if it is treated by ultra-violet filters which are not practical in domestic use as generally a rainwater tank will not store enough water for total consumption in a domestic situation.

What size rainwater harvesting tanks do I need?

The size of a rainwater holding tank must match the demand for water with it’s availability as closely as possible.

BS 8515:2009 provides an authoritative and industry-approved means of calculating the optimum size of tank for household water use.

Unlike other industries it is better to reduce the size of the tank rather than over size it if in doubt as to the requirement. This is due to the benefit of allowing the tank to overflow at least twice a year to flush out floating debris. The tank chosen must therefore be a balance between rainwater supply and water demand.

In order to correctly size the tank, the capacity should be the lesser of either the rainwater supply or the water demand. A worked example demonstrating this principle is shown below:-

tank_size

Are rainwater tanks worth it?

There are many reasons why using a water butt is a good idea. By collecting rainwater a water butt,  you are using a free natural resource. This puts less pressure on an already under pressure water system and reduces the demand put on the public water system. By collecting rainwater, less water goes down the storm drains and eliviates pressur on the public drainage system and help to prevent flooding. An added bonus to using rainwater for watering your plants is that the plants love natural rainwater with no chemicals added.